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950 Acres in Talbot County Conserved through Donated Easement to Maryland Department of Natural Resources

First donated public access easement in the history of Program Open Space

Annapolis, Md. (December 21, 2011) ─ Former Anne Arundel County Executive Bob Pascal and Reinecke Fuchs, Inc. are donating 950 acres in Talbot County to Program Open Space in a historic State conservation easement. This is the first donated public access easement in the history of Program Open Space, and will serve as a model for future projects.

“This is a historic donation and I want to thank Bob Pascal for this legacy to future generations,” said Governor Martin O’Malley. “This land will create new opportunities for Maryland families and visitors to get outside and enjoy the bountiful natural wonders of our Eastern Shore.”

The 950-acre perpetual conservation easement on the Point Pleasant property will protect valuable forest and farm land. It will maintain or establish more than eight miles of riparian buffers to protect the water quality of the Choptank River, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. Through coordinated and controlled access, visitors will be able to explore the land by kayak, horseback or on foot. The land will also be available for hunting, camping, fishing and other low-impact recreational activities. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will hold the conservation easement.

The entire Property falls within a Targeted Ecological Area, which DNR has identified as a conservation priority as part of the GreenPrint program, furthering the goals of the program.

The conservation easement protects public scenic views along approximately eight miles of waterfront on the Leadenham Creek, Broad Creek and Balls Creek, tributaries of the Choptank River.

The rural land in the Point Pleasant Farm project represents all habitats of the coastal Chesapeake Bay. Grasslands and croplands on the property provide foraging areas for nearly 200 migratory birds. Reptiles and amphibians, including spotted turtles, a State species of concern, an array of butterflies, dragonflies and other insects, crucial to the food web, are also found in the area. Tidal fringes and shallow water areas support fish, crabs, snails, shellfish and invertebrates and small crustaceans that serve as food sources for waterfowl, waterbirds and shorebirds.


   December 21, 2011

Contact: Josh Davidsburg
410-260-8002 office I 410-507-7526 cell
jdavidsburg@dnr.state.md.us

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is the state agency responsible for providing natural and living resource-related services to citizens and visitors. DNR manages nearly one-half million acres of public lands and 17,000 miles of waterways, along with Maryland's forests, fisheries and wildlife for maximum environmental, economic and quality of life benefits. A national leader in land conservation, DNR-managed parks and natural, historic and cultural resources attract 11 million visitors annually. DNR is the lead agency in Maryland's effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay, the state's number one environmental priority. DNR is the lead agency in Maryland's effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay, the state's number one environmental priority. Learn more at www.dnr.maryland.gov