Fishing Report Overview Maryland Dept of Natural Resources
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Latest Update: July 30, 2008 Next Update: August 6, 2008



Freshwater Fishing Reports

Western Region:

Fishermen at Deep Creek Lake have been spending their fishing time lately dodging every manner of speeding watercraft now that the summer vacation season is in full swing. Most have been hitting the water early in the morning for a few quiet hours and then getting off the lake before the boat traffic picks up as well as the summer heat. A number of fishermen reported good fishing for a mix of walleye, smallmouth bass and large yellow perch while drifting with leeches and nightcrawlers on slider rigs. They report choking grass Pictured is Central Region Fisheries Manager Charlie Gougeon with a beautiful Savage River brown trout. situations in the shallower coves making for some difficult fishing. Largemouth bass have tended to be evasive to those fishermen interviewed lately and it may be due to the fact that the bass are holding under these thick mats of grass. They did report chain pickerel were plentiful in the grassy areas.

Western region fisheries manager Alan Klotz sent in this report from the recent Savage River trout survey. The Inland Fisheries crew from Western Districts I and II, Central Region, Eastern Region, and Planning Unit staff as well as the Maryland Conservation Corps Crew Members joined forces to conduct the annual trout population survey in the Trophy Trout Fishing Area of the Savage River. The river is simply loaded with brown trout in the 12 to 18 inch size classes, along with a strong 2007 year-class of 8 inch trout. Brook trout make up about 15 – 20% of the total number of trout, and most of these trout are from the 2007 strong year-class, with some nicer brookies in the 8 to 10 inch category. Several of the fisheries biologists fished after the work was completed for the day, and showed that they don’t need an electro-shocker to catch some nice fish! osh Smith from Northeast spent a lazy morning drifting down the lower Susquehanna and came up with this nice smallmouth bass. Fisheries Biologist John Mullican reported that elk-hair caddis worked well in afternoon for both brook trout and some nice quality sized brown trout. Pictured is Central Region Fisheries Manager Charlie Gougeon with a beautiful Savage River brown trout.

Central/Southern Region:

Fishermen have been getting out in the early morning and evening hours to beat the summer heat and to also match their fishing time with the peak activity times for the fish they pursue. Largemouth bass in the reservoirs and lakes as well as the tidal rivers are feeding in the shallower areas during these cool low light periods. Most fishermen jump at the chance to cast surface lures such as weedless frogs and buzzbaits. Josh Smith from Northeast spent a lazy morning drifting down the lower Susquehanna and came up with this nice smallmouth bass.

James Houck spent some decompress time in Valentine Creek. The feisty pumpkinseed sunfish can often prove that often the small things in life tend to bring meaning.Fishermen can find lot’s of action with numerous other species of freshwater fish such as channel catfish, carp, chain pickerel and both yellow and white perch in the many tidal creeks and rivers throughout both regions. Most of them can be fished successfully from shorelines and docks or from small boats such as kayaks and canoes. It is a great way to wash away the worries of the day and dabble in some light fishing. James Houck spent some decompress time in Valentine Creek; which is a tributary to the Severn River recently just playing with a small fish that most fishermen rarely bother with. The feisty pumpkinseed sunfish can often prove that often the small things in life tend to bring meaning. These little fighters will give a good measure of themselves on ultra-light tackle any day of the week.

Eastern Region:

Now that the dog days of summer are here and the day’s heat tends to limit outdoor activity, most fishermen looking for some freshwater action with fish such as largemouth bass are fishing the early morning and late evening hours. This period of time of course matches what the largemouth bass have in mind also as they tend to hunker down in some deep shady spot for the day. In the cooler low light conditions of early morning and late evening they’ll become active and start to prowl the shallower areas looking for prey. Topwater lures such as buzzbaits and weedless soft frogs are good choices to cover grass beds and spatterdock fields along the edges of tidal rivers and creeks as well as lakes and ponds. Fishermen report good fishing for largemouth bass in the Nasawango Creek and the Pocomoke River from Shad Landing to Pocomoke City. Most stress that a falling tide offers the best fishing along the outside edges of thick grass and spatterdock fields.

The many small lakes and ponds that dot the region also offer good fishing for largemouth bass and chain pickerel if one can work through the submerged and emergent vegetation that often tends to reach its peak of growth this time of the year. Fishermen with light fly rods or ultra-light spinning tackle can have a lot of fun with bluegills this time of the year with small surface poppers. Fishing for channel catfish in some of the tidal rivers such as the Elk, Chester, Choptank and Nanticoke Rivers can also be a fun and relaxing way to spend a summer evening fishing from the shoreline or a small boat.


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Reservoir Bathymetry information:
The Maryland Geological Survey has bathymetry maps on their website:

Links to freshwater flows:

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