Maryland Angler's Log - Share Your Catch!

Maryland Angler's Log Logo showing image of Angler

To post a report please email your name, hometown, photos, location information, and the content for your report to fishingreports.dnr@maryland.gov. All information is optional, but encouraged.

Important Note: If anyone in your picture is under 18 years of age, we must have a photo release signed by a parent/guardian before we can post your picture. By sending any photos or art to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources you are giving DNR permission to use the image(s) online and in print. You are also giving DNR permission to distribute the photo for non-commercial purposes to other media, print, digital and television for their use. You are not giving up your copyright, but are allowing the photo(s) to be used for educational and news purposes. All Photos will be made available on Fisheries Service Flickr Page.

There will be a 2014 end-of-year random drawing from angler's participating in any of the Volunteer Angler Surveys. We encourage anglers to continue to report snakehead catches through the Inland Freshwater survey in addition to their Angler's Log submission. The information helps our biologists better understand the various species and water systems they utilize.

Maryland Fishing Challenge Logo showing striped bassA new component of the Maryland Fishing Challenge includes invasive species reports submitted to the Angler's Log. Beginning during the 2013/2014 tournament, Angler's Log entries which include Blue Catfish, Northern Snakehead or Flathead Catfish, at any length in size, will be eligible for up to two prizes via a random drawing at the annual Maryland Fishing Challenge Finale. Fish must be kept and a photo showing the kept fish is mandatory. Multiple entries are allowed, but each fish can only be entered once. Remember, all invasive species must be dead to be entered and there is no catch and release category. Visit the Maryland fishing Challenge web site to read the complete set of rules.

search the logs: 

  1. Keith Craig, Recreational Angler
  2. Total Reports: 7
  3. View all reports by Keith Craig →

Posted on October 21, 2014 | Permalink

Big Beaver Creek Rainbow

Type: Freshwater
Region: Central
Location: Beaver Creek

Keith caught this beautiful 6.7 lb rainbow in Beaver Creek on 10-16-14. The fish managed to not be caught since the spring stocking of 2014.

Tags: Rainbow Trout


  1. Vernon D Wilson, Recreational Angler
  2. Hagerstown, MD
  3. Total Reports: 1
  4. View all reports by Vernon D Wilson →

Posted on April 28, 2014 | Permalink

Beaver Creek Brown Trout

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Beaver Creek

Vernon caught this 12" Brown Trout. It was landed on a #20 Pheasant Tail Nymph on Beaver Creek 03/25/2014.

Tags: Brown Trout


  1. Devin Angleberger, Youth Angler
  2. Frederick
  3. Total Reports: 36
  4. View all reports by Devin Angleberger →

Posted on November 1, 2013 | Permalink

Beaver Creek Fly Fishing Section

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Beaver Creek

The catch and release, fly fishing only section of Beaver Creek was fishing very well the other day. I parked at the fly shop, and walked downstream to just above the U-turn, and fished upstream into the stocked water. I landed a few small ones on a double nymph rig; a size 16 cressbug with a little size 20 caddis pupae dropper. The water is very very low, and the fish are very spooky. I fished a three weight, with a 10ft 5x leader, and 6x to the dropper. Most lower pools you can high stick it through the runs, with a little split shot, and further upstream, I fished a small indicator. Very little surface activity besides a few small sips to midges, weather has been relatively warm, a few caddis might come off this week.

Tags: trout


  1. Richard Gunion, Recreational Angler
  2. Washington, D.C.
  3. Total Reports: 45
  4. View all reports by Richard Gunion →

Posted on October 28, 2013 | Permalink

Beaver Creek Fishing Report

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Lower Beaver Creek

I decided to take advantage of the fall stocking of lower Beaver Creek. I started fishing one of the holes by a small bridge. I talked to a fisherman who had been there for 3 hours in the morning and he caught only one trout. Fishing was slow but there were plenty of trout in the creek. I tried streamers and nymphs but these fish would not budge. One man gave directions to the mill so I went there and found a bunch of fisherman catching one here and there but I had no luck. One fisherman gave me a black and pink wooly bugger to try but still no luck. He had already caught his limit and said that the fly needed some color to get a strike. The fish would chase it but not bite. I guess that one day of heavy fishing pressure can make a lot of difference.

I headed up to Middle Creek to see if it had received another stocking. In one of the big pools I saw some Smallmouth Bass and maybe one Rainbow Trout but still the same thing happened-these fish would not bite. Water levels were really low and clear in Middle Creek which is usually slightly muddy.

I returned to Beaver Creek and the first place I fished at in the morning and hooked a Rainbow Trout on the black and pink wooly bugger. I landed him but did not get any more bites. Tried nymphs and finally a green streamer which got a strike but I lost the fish. The trees and limbs claimed quite a few of my flies and leaders as I could not help getting my fly line hooked in them.

I decided to go back to the mill and fished a streamer in one of the runs. Still no luck. It looked like my wife and I would only have one fish to share for dinner. Then I remembered a spot under one of the bridges at the mill. There were a bunch of trout stacked up in hole but still the same story-they would not bite on anything. I switched to tiny bead had nymph and tipped it with some leftover purple power bait. This did the trick and I soon filled my limit catching four fish at the mill in the late afternoon. I had to carefully maneuver the nymph so it would float directly into the trout's mouth. If it was off by 2 inches-no bites. It was a happy ending to an otherwise slow day of fishing. There might not be much left by now as the two put and take locations are receiving a steady stream of anglers. Most of the fish are small but good eating.

Tags: Rainbow Trout, Smallmouth Bass


  1. Richard Gunion, Recreational Angler
  2. Washington, D.C.
  3. Total Reports: 45
  4. View all reports by Richard Gunion →

Posted on May 22, 2013 | Permalink

Slow Bite at Friends and Owens

Type: Freshwater
Region: North Central
Location: Friend's Creek and Owen's Creek

I decided to head up to Friend's Creek and Owen's Creek to see if there were any fish left after the last stocking of spring. I first tried Owen's Creek turning several Brown Trout using a streamer fly but no luck. I headed up to Friend's Creek and hooked a nice brown on BWO nymph at a popular pool by the road. Tried the same nymph in several pools but the fish would not bite. A week makes a lot of difference - the trout are as tough to catch as those in the catch and release sections of the Gunpowder or Beaver Creek. Finally I fished one of the lower pools and hooked a nice rainbow. I returned to the hole where I hooked the brown but no luck. There are some fish left but getting them to bite is not easy. The spring scenery is pretty in spite of the slow bite. Power bait anglers might have better luck. I finished the day at lower Owen's Creek with another smaller Brown Trout. I caught 3 trout in all-enough for dinner. People were telling me how hot the weather is - around 86F and it is not even June yet. The photo is of the Brown Trout I caught-about 12". Tight lines all.

Tags: Brown Trout, Rainbow Trout


  1. Lee DuQuin, Recreational Angler
  2. Total Reports: 1
  3. View all reports by Lee DuQuin →

Posted on May 9, 2013 | Permalink

Beautiful Tiger Trout

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Devil's Backbone Dam

This is my trophy Tiger Trout that I caught on the morning of 4-26-13 at Devil's Backbone Dam in Hagerstown, MD. I was told this particular kind of fish is not common in MD, so i'm not sure how it got here considering rainbow & brown are the commonly stocked trout in MD. I sure am proud of my birthday catch! Thank You for this opportunity.

DNR Response: Your Tiger Trout is a hatchery trout, not a natural cross. A few years ago we handled a stocking permit for Tiger Trout further upstream in Beaver Creek (Beaver Creek flows into Antietam Creek at Devils Backbone). Recently fishermen have also reported catching large hatchery Brook Trout in the lower portion of Beaver Creek. It is possible that additional Tiger Trout and Brook Trout were stocked in the area of Beaver Creek and made their way down to Antietam Creek. Your Tiger Trout is a novel prize.

Tags: Tiger Trout


  1. Steve Peperak, Recreational Angler
  2. Total Reports: 1
  3. View all reports by Steve Peperak →

Posted on April 10, 2013 | Permalink

Beaver Creek Brown Trout

Type: Freshwater
Region: Central
Location: Beaver Creek

My daughter Baylee had an great day of Trout fishing on Beaver Creek, near Hagerstown. She landed several including this nice Brown Trout.

Tags: Brown Trout


  1. Phillip Meredith, Recreational Angler
  2. NA
  3. Total Reports: 38
  4. View all reports by Phillip Meredith →

Posted on March 25, 2013 | Permalink

Mix of Fish From Salisbury

Type: Freshwater
Region: Eastern
Location: Beaver Dam Creek

Fun fishing with minnows at Beaverdam Creek in Salisbury, MD. Caught a few crappies, a small chain pickerel and a guy I was talking to landing a small size bass... it was a good mix of fish.

Tags: Black Crappie, Chain Pickerel


  1. Devin Angleberger, Youth Angler
  2. Frederick
  3. Total Reports: 36
  4. View all reports by Devin Angleberger →

Posted on September 4, 2012 | Permalink

Beaver Creek Has Been Good To Me

Type: Freshwater
Region: Central
Location: Beaver Creek

Beaver Creek has fished well lately, hoppers, scuds, as well as wet ants have been the ticket. This is a great fishery with great potential and lots of fish. The presentation must be good, no drag. Fished a couple sections including the upper fly only, and some private water which I was lucky enough to gain permission to fish it. Biggest brown has been right around 13", and a couple wild rainbows reaching 9", but most of the wild rainbows I caught were around 7" and their colors are beautiful. Biggest fish from the private water was a 19" rainbow who fought like a wild, but was not "born" in the stream, but sure did have some awesome colors.

Tags: brown trout, rainbow trout


  1. Sarah Burton, Fisheries Intern
  2. Total Reports: 8
  3. View all reports by Sarah Burton →

Posted on June 29, 2012 | Permalink

Week 3: A Week Full of Travel and Great Experience

Type:
Region: Eastern, Western, Northern
Location: Tred Avon River, Cambridge, Beaver Creek, Otter Point Creek

My third week at DNR was particularly eventful. On Monday, I worked with Chris Judy, Program Manager of Marylanders Grow Oysters. This program strives to replenish the oyster population by having individuals from around the state grow oysters in cages (built by Maryland inmates) off of their private piers for nine months to a year while the oysters are at a vulnerable, young age. The piers we visited were located on the Tred Avon River, in Oxford. The oysters we pulled up were smaller than I expected and latched onto larger, empty oyster shells, which they had attached to as spat, or juvenile oysters. We took random samples from some locations, counting the live oysters, scars (marks from a detached oyster), and boxes (empty, attached oyster shells) on each larger shell. After collecting the oysters from the cages, we planted them at an oyster sanctuary nearby on the Tred Avon.

On Tuesday, I went along with Steve Vilnit and Kelly Barnes on a daytrip taking four chefs to a small, private, soft shell crab farm, Choptank Sweets Oyster Farm, J.M. Clayton (the world’s oldest crab house), and a lunch at Ocean Odyssey in Cambridge. The softshell crab farm was at first hard to spot but we pulled into the driveway of an older, private residence where we were welcomed to a separate area behind the house where they kept soft crabs. Upon entering we observed water, kept close to the crabs' natural salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen levels, being circulated into several long bins where dozens of crabs at different stages of molting were kept. We even got to touch a soft, squishy molting crab. At J.M. Clayton, we toured the facility and saw every stage of the process starting with fresh delivery of crabs by local watermen, to the hand-picking right next door by about 90 lightning-fast pickers, to packaging the fresh crabmeat, some of which we received and gladly devoured. At the oyster farm, we saw hundreds of floating cages, located in relatively shallow water near the shore of the Choptank, containing millions of oysters. We learned about their growing process, starting with tiny spat which, when mature enough, would be put in these floating cages to eventually be harvested and sold. We were also lucky enough to enjoy some fresh oysters right on the spot as well. On the shore of the farm, we pulled out our crabmeat from J.M. Clayton and some obligatory Old Bay to top our oysters with, and each thoroughly enjoyed the food and scenery.

On Wednesday I accompanied John Mullican and a small crew to two sites on Beaver Creek for a summer trout survey. It was here that I learned about electrofishing as a method to determine the abundance and health of fish populations. The crew carried two backpacks, wired to batteries and connected to a tail-like cathode and an anode which they would sweep across their front to stun nearby fish for collection. I was told repeatedly never to touch the water while electrofishing, as it would deliver a strong and uncomfortable shock. Though it was difficult in mid-torso deep water with a net in one hand and bucket in the other, luckily none of us had to experience this. During this survey, we were only after brown and rainbow trout, but we encountered lots of suckers and minnows, and some darters and sculpin. For each site, we would set up a net up ahead of us to ensure we collected only what could be found at this site at one time and prevent any other fish from drifting in. We completed three runs for each site in order to collect as many of the fish as possible and afterwards, we would weigh and measure them and compare the data to previous years and differently locations, focusing on locations where efforts had been made to restore the natural environment of trout.

On Friday, I joined Andrew Becker at a stream survey at Otter Point Creek in Harford County. This survey greatly differed from the Beaver Creek survey. Instead of a total crew of six, this survey enlisted a crew at least twice as large. At Beaver Creek, the water was fairly clear and near fifty degrees, and the stream was rocky and turbulent. Otter Point Creek was very murky and slow-moving with a much higher temperature. The creek was deep and had slippery clay banks and deep mud towards the center of the creek. Had I not been wearing waders, I definitely would've lost a shoe or two. Electrofishing seemed more treacherous than ever as we dragged a very small "cataraft" with a generator and plugs for each of the four connected anodes that Andrew and his crew swept back and forth in front of them. Each of us carried nets and snatched every fish we came into contact with, including several eels (a few of which I witnessed disturbingly snacking on one another in my bucket), redbreast sunfish, pumpkinseed and a white catfish to name a few. The crew counted the numbers of each different species we collected in an effort to determine the health of Otter Point Creek as compared to previous years. Similar surveys are preformed on creeks and streams around Maryland. To learn about these surveys, you can visit Maryland Biological Stream Survey.

This week, I was extremely excited to have received so many invitations to shadow and assist so many different, influential people in a field which I would love to be a part of one day. Thanks to everyone who brought me along and patiently taught me so much!

Tags: oyster, blue crabs, brown trout, rainbow trout, eels, redbreast sunfish, pumpkinseed, white catfish

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