Maryland Angler's Log - Share Your Catch!

Maryland Angler's Log Logo showing image of Angler

To post a report please email your name, hometown, photos, location information, and the content for your report to fishingreports.dnr@maryland.gov. All information is optional, but encouraged.

Important Note: If anyone in your picture is under 18 years of age, we must have a photo release signed by a parent/guardian before we can post your picture. By sending any photos or art to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources you are giving DNR permission to use the image(s) online and in print. You are also giving DNR permission to distribute the photo for non-commercial purposes to other media, print, digital and television for their use. You are not giving up your copyright, but are allowing the photo(s) to be used for educational and news purposes. All Photos will be made available on Fisheries Service Flickr Page.

There will be a 2014 end-of-year random drawing from angler's participating in any of the Volunteer Angler Surveys. We encourage anglers to continue to report snakehead catches through the Inland Freshwater survey in addition to their Angler's Log submission. The information helps our biologists better understand the various species and water systems they utilize.

Maryland Fishing Challenge Logo showing striped bassA new component of the Maryland Fishing Challenge includes invasive species reports submitted to the Angler's Log. Beginning during the 2013/2014 tournament, Angler's Log entries which include Blue Catfish, Northern Snakehead or Flathead Catfish, at any length in size, will be eligible for up to two prizes via a random drawing at the annual Maryland Fishing Challenge Finale. Fish must be kept and a photo showing the kept fish is mandatory. Multiple entries are allowed, but each fish can only be entered once. Remember, all invasive species must be dead to be entered and there is no catch and release category. Visit the Maryland fishing Challenge web site to read the complete set of rules.

search the logs: 

  1. Brian Zagalsky, Youth Angler
  2. Total Reports: 4
  3. View all reports by Brian Zagalsky →

Posted on August 11, 2014 | Permalink

Award Size Mackerel

Type: Chesapeake
Region:
Location: The Bay

We were fishing for bluefish and we went to a ship and I casted a firetiger lure out and brought it in. I thought I had a really big blue, and when it got close enough that I could see itís markings I yelled at the top of my lungs that itís a Spanish Mackerel. After it ran 5 times I got it in and my dad netted it. The fish was 23.5 inches and I was even more excited because it was a citation too! The next day we devoured it and it was delicious. That was one of the best fishing days of my life.

Tags: Bluefish, Spanish Mackerel


  1. Jack Fisk, Youth Angler
  2. Gaithersburg, MD
  3. Total Reports: 2
  4. View all reports by Jack Fisk →

Posted on August 11, 2014 | Permalink

Local Pond Channel Cat

Type: Freshwater
Region: Central
Location: Local Pond

Caught this giant catfish (39 inches in length) in a local pond fishing for carp, is it a blue or a channel? If it is a channel is it close to state record?

DNR Response: Just looking at the picture I'd call it a Channel Catfish. Pond fish tend to look a little differently than their tidal or river cousins and once Channel Catfish get larger they loose that characteristic yellow/bronze color with spots. We've had some large channels that looked very blue too. The real diagnostic features of a Blue Catfish is the large head (which this one doesn't appear to have), and the straight anal fin (which we can't really see). But the tail, head and little bit of the anal fin that we can see looks like a channel. Of course, if it's in contention for any records it would have to be examined by a Biologist for definite confirmation.

Tags: Channel Catfish


  1. Timothy Newman, Recreational Angler
  2. Total Reports: 1
  3. View all reports by Timothy Newman →

Posted on August 11, 2014 | Permalink

Long Day, But Worth It

Type: Tidal
Region: Central
Location: Patapsco River

Today we finally got a few crabs. It was tough going and we only caught 2 dozen keepers but boy were they keepers. Janet is holding two of the crabs we caught. Most were this size. We were crabbing traps in the Patapsco River near Ft Carroll. Long day but well worth the trip!

Tags: Blue Crab


  1. Ronnie Gross, Recreational Angler
  2. Hagerstown, MD
  3. Total Reports: 1
  4. View all reports by Ronnie Gross →

Posted on August 11, 2014 | Permalink

Upper Potomac Catfish

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Dam 4 Potomac River

Ronnie caught this 25 inch catfish at dam 4 on the Potomac River.

Tags: Catfish


  1. Brandon Baer, Recreational Angler
  2. Middletown
  3. Total Reports: 1
  4. View all reports by Brandon Baer →

Posted on August 11, 2014 | Permalink

Caught a Catfish Night Fishing

Type: Freshwater
Region: Central
Location: Potomac River

I caught this monster in the Potomac River halfway between route 15 and Brunswick at Lander Road about 300 yards downstream from the boat dock. It was caught about 11 o'clock at night on a half a nightcrawler on a small lined hook, swivel and 2.5oz sinker on an ugly stick with a nine bearing fleuger reel. I was unable to weigh him but he was very difficult to hold up for the pictures. For the record I wear a size 10.5 boot and want to show off my catch. Happy fishing.

Tags: Catfish


  1. Alan Klotz, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 65
  3. View all reports by Alan Klotz →

Posted on August 8, 2014 | Permalink

Savage River Trophy Trout Fishing Area Survey

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Savage River

The Savage River downstream of the Savage River Reservoir in Garrett County was recently surveyed to monitor the status of the wild trout population. The river is managed as a Trophy Trout Fishing Area with two separate management areas. The area from the dam downstream to the Allegany Bridge is a Fly Fishing Only Area and supported an amazing density of adult trout estimated at 1,179 trout per mile! The Single-hook Artificial Lures and Flies Area from the Allegany Bridge downstream 2.7 miles to the mouth of the river also had a very similar density of 1,170 adult trout per mile. Brown Trout comprise 82% of the population, followed by 12% Brook Trout, and 6% Rainbow Trout. Even a 14 inch Cutthroat Trout was collected during the survey. Many thanks to the MD DNR Fisheries Service staff, Wildlife Service staff, and Garrett College Natural Resource Program students that assisted in the surveys.

Pictured are 1) Jessica Klotz with a Brown Trout 2) Kelsey Hottel with a 12 inch Brook Trout, 3) Charlee Cramer with a Brown Trout 4) Zach Beal with a Rainbow Trout 5) Cinthia Myers with the Cutthroat Trout

Tags: Savage River Trophy Trout Fishing Area Survey, Brown Trout, Brook Trout, Rainbow Trout, Cutthroat Trout


  1. Erik_Zlokovitz, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 8
  3. View all reports by Erik_Zlokovitz →

Posted on August 8, 2014 | Permalink

White Perch and Spot Fishing with the kids

Type: Tidal
Region: Southern
Location: Lower Severn River

With summer swim team meets ending and school starting soon, I've been trying to get in some good fishing sessions in the lower Severn River with the kids, targeting mainly white perch and spot. I've been fishing the area between Jonas Green Park, Chase Creek, and the lower part of Round Bay. We have been fishing a combination of shore, dock, and boat with my son Ethan and daughter Hallie, including a boat trip with a neighbor - Professor Howard Ernst from the Naval Academy. Spinners and grass shrimp worked well for perch, and bloodworms have been best for spot. Spot have been running large, but most of the perch have been small or medium. Other species encountered at the Chase Creek dock, and Round Bay are pumpkinseed, pickerel, and a few small croaker. In late August-October, we often see a run of small bluefish at Jonas Green Park, and the best bait for the blues has been cut spot fished on a standard top-bottom rig.

Ethan is graduating from spincast to spinning rod, which has been fun to watch. I also notice that the kids sometimes have more fun just catching the grass shrimp for bait, using a simple long-handled dip net with fine mesh. Here is a picture of Ethan with a white perch caught on grass shrimp bait in Chase Creek, a tributary of the Severn River, in Arnold, MD. Note the proper fishing clothing (Yankees shirt!) and the orange Shakespeare spinning rod, which is replacing the old spincast rod laying on the dock.

Tags: White Perch, Spot, Pumpkinseed, Chain Pickerel, Croaker, Bluefish


  1. 123 Fishing Rigs, Recreational Angler
  2. Fort Washington, MD
  3. Total Reports: 6
  4. View all reports by 123 Fishing Rigs →

Posted on August 8, 2014 | Permalink

Lower Potomac Variety

Type: Tidal
Region: Southern
Location: Potomac river

Bottom fished the lower Potomac below the 301 bridge. Caught several spot, croaker and perch but the big surprise came while testing umbrella rigs for bottom fishing. We caught 13 perfect sized catfish while dragging a 15 inch castable umbrella rig on the bottom in 14 feet of water. We placed an in-line weight up front, left the bait arms expanded but empty and put bloodworm and cut-bait on the long center arm. Dragging the bait kept the bait just above the bottom with zero snags.

Tags: Catfish, Spot, Croaker, Perch


  1. Jeff Alt, Recreational Angler
  2. Total Reports: 1
  3. View all reports by Jeff Alt →

Posted on August 8, 2014 | Permalink

Bodkin Bass

Type: Tidal
Region: Southern
Location: Bodkin Creek

Picture shown is my friend Kent Casper holding a bass I caught on 8/5/2014 off a pier on the Bodkin.

Tags: Largemouth Bass


  1. Erik_Zlokovitz, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 8
  3. View all reports by Erik_Zlokovitz →

Posted on August 7, 2014 | Permalink

Tuesday Night at the White Marlin Open

Type: Ocean
Region: Eastern
Location: Ocean City

I enjoy getting down the Ocean City White Marlin occasionally for the change in scenery and there is always interesting people watching at the weigh-in! Crowds have been gathering here for years to catch a glimpse of prize-winning White Marlin, Blue Marlin, Bigeye Tuna and other species.

I worked Tuesday night, August 5th. One or two DNR biologists are on site each evening to make sure that marlin and sharks are tagged and the associated cards are filled out with boat name, Highly Migratory Species (HMS) permit holder name, HMS permit number, fish length and fish weight. We also tag Bluefin Tuna, but bluefin are very rare in August at the Open.

Tuesday night turned out to be a relatively slow night at the weigh-in scale. Out of 288 boats registered, only 66 fished on Tuesday, while the rest "Layed-in" at the dock. I speculated that some boats stayed in due to Tropical Storm Bertha passing offshore. However, the word on the dock was that sea conditions were not too bad (5-6 feet max), and fishable, especially for the larger boats.

The one White Marlin landed was on the boat BAR South (Boat #15). The fish was landed by an angler from Baltimore. Lower jaw fork length was 67.5 in, weight 67 lbs. The fish did not meet the minimum weight category to qualify for the White Marlin category in the tournament leaderboard. The fish was dissected by graduate students Kate Fingles and Samantha Lucas, working in Dr. Ann Barse's lab at Dept. of Biological Sciences, Salisbury University. Dr. Barse is studying natural parasites found in White Marlin, usually in the gill area. The fish was then filleted and steaked, and the meat was donated to local homeless shelters.

In addition to the White Marlin, there was one large Wahoo, 5-6 Dolphin, and 1 or 2 Bigeye Tuna. No sharks or Blue Marlin.

I would expect more much more activity at the weigh-in on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. (August 6-8).

Tags: White Marlin Open, White Marlin, Blue Marlin, Bigeye Tuna, Bluefin Tuna, Wahoo

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