Ash Tree ID

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)

​Do I have an ash tree?

Look for these signs to identify whether you have an ash tree:

Ash tree branching photosOpposite branching (left) - Branches grow directly across from each other. Most other tree species have alternate branching (right).
 




Ash tree Winged fruitOar-shaped, winged fruit






 
Ash tree coumpound leavesCompound leaves - Multiple leaflets, usually 5-9, come from the same stem.
 






Ash tree "hershey kiss"  shaped buds“Hershey kiss” shaped buds
 





Diamond shaped ridges on barkDiamond shaped ridges on bark
 







Ash Tree -  Straight stout branchesStraight stout branches
 





 These trees are often mistaken for ash:

Hickory tree Identification Photos
Hickory
- Branching is alternate and the tree has large hickory nuts instead of samaras.
 
Tulip Poplar identification photos
Tulip poplar
- leaves are simple (one leaf per stem) and branching is alternate. Stems are usually tall and straight, with limited lower branching
 
Walnut tree identification photos
Walnut
- Ridges on bark are much deeper than ash. Leaves have 10-24 leaflets, branching is alternate, and the tree has large walnuts.
 
BoxElder-ID.png
Boxelder - Twigs are green to purple in color. Some leaves will have lobes (resembling a maple leaf), with only about 3 leaflets per leaf.
 

Photo Acknowledgements:

  • Branching, bark and branches: Colleen Kenny, MD DNR Forest Service
  • Leaves: J. Seiler, E. Jensen, A. Niemiera, and J. Peterson. Virginia Tech Dept. of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.
  • Seeds, Buds (white ash), Buds (green ash) : J. Seiler, E. Jensen, A. Niemiera, and J. Peterson. Virginia Tech Dept. of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. 
  • Hickory, Tulip poplar, Walnut and Box elder photo collages: J. Seiler, E. Jensen, A. Niemiera, and J. Peterson. Virginia Tech Dept. of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.